Daihatsu Cast


Debut: 2015
Maker: Daihatsu
Predecessor: Move (2013)



 Published on 9 Jan 2017
All rights reserved. 




Following the footprints of Suzuki Wagon R, the tall-body Daihatsu Move ran neck to neck with the Suzuki at the top of the domestic K-car sales chart since the mid-1990s. In recent years, the market trend shifted towards even taller MPV-style K-cars like Honda N-Box and Daihatsu Tanto. As a result, sales of both Move and Wagon R decreased a lot. However, they still contribute to significant numbers, so it is still vital to keep them fresh and competitive. The current generation Move was launched at the end of 2014 as a 2015 model. Amazingly, it was just 2 years after the last generation. Why did its predecessor live so short? Because Daihatsu found its packaging was uncompetitive – the exterior design was slightly dull, the interior looked outdated and low in quality. The handling was okay but the ride quality fell behind the competition, so did the fuel economy. This time around, Daihatsu kept the existing platform but repackaged the car inside and outside, reworked its body, suspension and aero to realize the potential of the platform. The result is respectable.

Unsurprisingly, the new Move keeps hard points and therefore all key dimensions unchanged, including the 2455mm wheelbase. The new body uses more high-strength steel in its construction thus it is stiffer, especially at the floorpan, yet 20 kg lighter. Nevertheless, some weight is added back by reinforcing the suspension mounting, new shock absorbers and upgrade of equipment, so the whole car actually gains 10 kg.


Move Custom




Outside, although the profile is unaltered, changes to the styling are obvious. It uses more recesses and crease lines and more angular geometry to deliver a stronger sense of character, even though I think it gets overcomplicated. It also looks larger than before, more like an MPV. This is achieved by using a horizontal shoulder line instead of the gently rising one on the old car. The side effect is the reduction of side glass area hence sense of openness in the cabin. Rear quarter visibility is hampered a little by the kick at the C-pillar. The new pseudo grille at the nose section of bonnet adds further to the sense of MPV. Upmarket version Move Custom looks even closer to Japanese luxury MPVs, thanks to the heavy dose of chrome, the big mask grille and LED-heavy headlamps. To me, it looks quite outrageous.

Thanks to standard rear spoiler, tweaks to aerodynamics and revised powertrain patterns, fuel economy is improved a bit, if not good enough to match Suzuki Wagon R with mild hybrid system.

Inside, the changes are more positive than the outside. While the dashboard is built on the existing architecture, it is finished in better quality plastics (still hard, but properly grained and colored). A touchscreen is added above the center console, while the new instrument is illuminated. Cabin space is identical to the old car’s, which is excellent for its size. With the rear seat slid rearward, the car is capable to take four six-footers with ease, thanks to plenty of legroom and headroom. The front seats have a larger backrest for better support. The rear seat remains too flat and hard for long journey comfort though. As before, the rear seat is 50/50-split and can slide and fold independently. Unfortunately, in a bid to cut cost, the rear seat no longer descends when folded, thus there is a step in the load bay. To reduce the step, Daihatsu lowered the rear seat by 10mm, but this in turn hurt sitting comfort as the seat is mounted too low.





The car keeps using the existing 3-cylinder naturally aspirated engine with 52hp. Its maximum torque needs as high as 5200 rpm to realize, so performance is poor. Turbocharged version is much better if you don’t mind to pay more for purchasing and fuel. Its peak torque arrives at 3200 rpm (800 rpm lower than last gen), and the magnitude is much stronger. As you don’t need to squeeze the engine as hard in overtaking or uphill, refinement is improved. There is now a Power mode which alters the engine and CVT mapping to help dealing with those situations.

On the road, the most obvious improvement is ride and handling. The stiffer chassis and tweaked suspension pay off here, resulting in improved directional stability and a firm but more composed ride. As before, the front and rear anti-roll bars keep body roll well checked in corner, at least for a car this tall, but now the roll rate is more progressive. Hit a mid-corner bump and the suspension soaks up without bouncing off the ground. As a result, the car feels more secured and matured, more like a B-segment car than a K-car. Its ride and handling balance is better than Wagon R, which feels lighter and more fragile.

However, despite of the model changeover, sales of the Move continued to decrease in 2015 and 2016, even though it dropped less than Wagon R. The golden years of Move seems unlikely to return in the new market trend.
Verdict: 
Specifications





Year
Layout
Chassis
Body
Length / width / height
Wheelbase
Engine
Capacity
Valve gears
Induction
Other engine features
Max power
Max torque
Transmission
Suspension layout

Suspension features
Tires
Kerb weight
Top speed
0-60 mph (sec)
0-100 mph (sec)
Move
2015
Front-engined, FWD
Steel monocoque
Mainly steel, some resin
3395 / 1475 / 1630 mm
2455 mm
Inline-3
658 cc
DOHC 12 valves, DVVT
-
-
52 hp / 6800 rpm
44 lbft / 5200 rpm
CVT
F: strut
R: torsion-beam
-
155/65SR14
820 kg
-
-
-
Move Custom RS
2015
Front-engined, FWD
Steel monocoque
Mainly steel, some resin
3395 / 1475 / 1630 mm
2455 mm
Inline-3
658 cc
DOHC 12 valves
Turbo
-
64 hp / 6400 rpm
68 lbft / 3200 rpm
CVT
F: strut
R: torsion-beam
-
165/55VR15
850 kg
-
-
-



























Performance tested by: -





AutoZine Rating

General models



    Copyright© 1997-2017 by Mark Wan @ AutoZine