Mercedes C-class (W205)


Debut: 2014 (sedan) / 2015 (coupe)
Maker: Mercedes-Benz
Predecessor: C-class (W204) / C-class Coupe (C204)



 Published on 5 May 2014
All rights reserved. 


First impression: isn't it a baby S-class? Yes, the new W205 C-class skips E-class and takes genes directly from the flagship S-class! Why do I say that? There are a lot of hints, such as its exterior design, its aluminum-intensive chassis, 4-link front suspension as well as the Airmatic air suspension option. The once "baby Mercedes" seems to have elevated to half a class higher than its usual rivals BMW 3-Series and Audi A4.

Size-wise, it has really grown a lot, because its MRA platform is to be shared with the next generation E-class. Its wheelbase has been stretched by 80 mm to 2840 mm, longer than the 3-Series and A4 by about 30 mm. Overall length and width are increased by 95 mm and 40 mm respectively. Such a growth is made possible by the introduction of CLA-class, which is almost as large as the old C-class.

Not only gets larger, its exterior styling has strong family resemblance to the new S-class, especially the headlights and taillights, the side view and the tail. Its gently falling boot may take some getting used to, but the resultant slippery shape benefits aerodynamics. The sleekest model, C220 Bluetec Eco, achieves an outstanding drag coefficient of 0.24, leveling with the S-class, E-class Coupe and trails only CLA-class, once again showing Mercedes' lead in this field. Other four-cylinder models range between 0.26 and 0.27.

There are again 2 kinds of front end design for customers to choose – a classic radiator grille with the 3-pointed star logo mounted on top of the bonnet and a sportier grille with centrally positioned logo. The latter is definitely the one to have.



Despite of the larger dimensions, Mercedes claims the new car is up to 100 kg lighter than the car it replaces (note: actual numbers might be smaller. For example, the entry-level C180 now weighs 1320 kg DIN, 75 kg lighter than the old model, whereas C250 weighs 25 kg less than the last one). This must thanks to its aluminum intensive chassis. 48 percent of it is made of aluminum, including nearly all body panels (bonnet, boot lid, fenders, doors and even roof), the front and rear suspension mounting brackets and a few other structural components. Besides, ultra-high-strength steel is extensively used in the rest of the structure. This also lifts its chassis rigidity by 20 percent versus the last generation.

The extensive use of aluminum is a surprise to me, because until now none of its rivals dare to do so (although next year's Jaguar XE will feature an all-aluminum structure). BMW has been using part aluminum chassis on its 5-Series for a decade but still it refuses to do so on the mass market 3-series on the ground of cost. Ditto Audi, which has never applied its ASF technology to its A4. How can Mercedes overcome the cost problem? or perhaps it wants to push the C-class upmarket?

The suspensions are also more upmarket. Like the S-class, it has switched to an all-new 4-link front suspension instead of the old 3-link strut. This allows the suspension geometry to be fully decoupled from the spring strut, improving wheel position under lateral forces and enhancing the sensitivity of steering.

As before, mechanical amplitude selective dampers are standard on all models. There are also a choice of 3 suspension settings when you purchase the car – a comfort setting, a sportier setting and an even sportier setting with 15 mm lower ride height. What makes difference now is the possibility to opt for Airmatic air suspension, which combines adaptive air springs, adaptive damping and self-leveling function. Drivers can select among 5 modes, i.e. Eco, Comfort, Sport, Sport+ and Individual which allows custom settings. It goes without saying that it is the first car in the class to offer air suspension.


Mercedes normally doesn't launch new engines on a new car, so what we see now are mostly carried over units. At launch, there is a 1.6-liter turbo petrol for C180 (156 hp), 2.0-liter turbo petrol for C200 (184 hp) and C250 (211 hp), as well as 2.1-liter turbo diesel for C220 Bluetec (170 hp) and C250 Bluetec (204 hp).

Soon it will add some interesting new engines. New model C300 will be powered by a 238 hp / 273 lbft version of the 2-liter turbo petrol, and should be a good answer to BMW 328i. New range topper C400 will replace the old C350 and employ the new 333 hp / 354 lbft twin-turbo 3.0 V6 from the E-class. There won't be naturally aspirated V6 anymore. Like BMW, Mercedes will concentrate on fuel-efficient turbo four and reserve six-cylinder for high performance offerings.

On the lower end of the spectrum, the C-class will introduce Renault's new 1.6 turbo diesel (as part of the collaboration between the two firms). It will have two states of tune, 115 hp and 136 hp. Expect it to be the super-frugal choice and key to help Mercedes to meet European CO2 cap.

There will be two further hybrid models. C300 Bluetec Hybrid mates the 204 hp 2.1-liter turbo diesel with a 27 hp electric motor – yes, the same mild hybrid combo as the existing E300 Bluetec Hybrid. It emits only 94 grams of CO2 per km. Even more interesting is a new plug-in hybrid, which will combine a 2-liter turbo petrol and a 68 hp electric motor.

Transmission can be either a 6-speed manual or 7G-Tronic Plus automatic. The latter is expected to be replaced by the new 9G-Tronic some time later.

Thanks to the improved aerodynamics, reduced weight, more efficient engines and reprogrammed gearboxes, among others, the new C-class cuts fuel consumption by 20 percent. Most of its models have lower emissions than the equivalent 3-Series and A4. Most notably, the C220 Bluetec emits only 103 g/km of CO2, while C250 Bluetec, C180 and C250 emit 109 g, 116 g and 123 g respectively. Being greener yet more luxurious, who doesn't like it?

In the Cabin



For long Audi has been occupying the top spot of cabin design and build quality. Now Mercedes finally comes out of its shadow. The interior of C-class combines tasteful style with top-notch quality. It feels classier than anything in the class, and is well worthy of the nickname “Baby S-class”. The leather trim is tastefully decorated with aluminum or wood inserts. The plastics are all high-grade items. The 5 circular air vents look stylish and feel good to touch. The buttons and switches feel precise and well damped. The steering wheel has a substantial feel. Although the instrument is not a large TFT screen like the S-class, it looks expensive enough for the class. The senior car’s chair-shape seat controls, perfumer and Comand infotainment system with touch pad are present. Although the system is not as intuitive to use as BMW’s i-Drive, you will adapt to it quickly. The 7-inch screen displays clear graphics.

As expected, the front passengers enjoy plenty of room. Strangely, rear seat space is not much improved from the old car despite of the increased wheelbase. It offers a bit more shoulder room, but headroom and legroom are compromised by the sloping roof line. This mean rear passengers will get more comfort in BMW 3-Series.

On the Road

With 3 suspension options, a wide range of engines and 5 different driving modes to choose from, it is not easy to describe how the C-class drive in a few words. However, in general the optimum package is C250 petrol equipped with air suspension. In this guise, the car is really sweet to drive and to travel along. Its lighter front end makes better use of the variable-ratio steering to give an agile handling not found in the old car. Although the steering doesn’t deliver a lot of feel, it weighs up consistently in corners and steers the car precisely. Switch to Sport mode, the car corners with a new found enthusiasm, thanks to a tight body control and good grip on offer. It is not as sporty as the 3-Series though, which remains to be the enthusiast’s top choice.


However, its ride comfort and running refinement contributed by the air suspension is superb. In fact, it is peerless in the class. It flows smoothly on most roads and isolates road noises like a bigger limousine. This makes long distance journeys especially relaxing. Loyal customers of Mercedes must love it.

Cars not fitted with Airmatic but the Comfort-oriented steel-spring suspension is not as impressive, as it rolls quite a lot in corners and feels less composed over undulations. As the Airmatic costs only £900, it is a must have.

The C250’s petrol engine is also the most sensible option, because it offers a good combination of power, flexibility, smoothness, quietness and fuel economy. Comparatively, Mercedes’ 2.1-liter turbo diesel is too coarse and noisy, and its tremendous torque causes more roughness to the gearshift of 7G-Tronic, which is already a bit less seamless than the ZF 8-speed automatic used by BMW. What about the range topping C400? In isolation, its twin-turbo V6 is wonderful – very strong and flexible, more so than BMW’s N55. Unfortunately, it makes the car feels nose-heavy thus it is not a balanced package.

Overall, the 3-Series is still considered to be the best car of the class due to its sportier handling, better diesel engines and a better integration between chassis and engine. It also holds an edge in rear seat accommodation. However, if you give comfort, quality, luxury and style more weighting, the Mercedes will be a clear winner, because no one else can feel so close to being a small limousine.
Verdict: 
 Published on 26 Feb 2015
All rights reserved. 
C450 AMG


15 years ago, Audi raised the bar of compact sports sedans by introducing the 380-horsepower RS4. That also created the 2-tier structure of its performance cars lineup (S and RS) that we know today. In response to the challenge of RS4, BMW and Mercedes upgraded their M3 and AMG C-class with significantly more powerful engines and performance levels. This created gulfs between M3 and the regular 3-series as well as between C63 and lesser C-class. BMW bridges that gap nicely with 335i. Now Mercedes also follows its rivals to introduce a performance model that sits below the C63. It is called C450 AMG.

Unlike a real AMG, the C450 is produced at the standard production line. Its engine is a tuned version of the 3.0-liter twin-turbo direct-injected V6 that used to serve C400 with which it replaces. In contrast, the C63 has a thoroughbred AMG V8 hand-built at Affalterbach. Despite that, the C450 AMG looks remarkably close to C63. It gets the same skirts, rear bumper with diffusers and quad-exhaust. The front end design differs a bit, but its pronounced front splitter and large intakes are no less aggressive. In fact, I find its front grille with bright radial patterns (like A45 AMG) more stylish than the black one on C63. Judging from looks alone, it loses nothing to the full-blooded AMG model.

The twin-turbo V6 gets higher turbo boost pressure, lifting its output from 333 to 367 horsepower, while maximum torque is improved from 354 to 382 lbft. That puts it well beyond the reach of its rival 335i (306 hp/295 lbft) and S4 (333 hp/324 lbft). Inevitably, the higher boost results in a hint of turbo lag at low rev, especially when compared with the ultra-responsive BMW 3.0-liter twin-scroll turbo straight-six. In return, its superior mid-range punch overwhelms its rivals and overcomes the slight hesitation of 7G-Tronic transmission, so that 0-60 mph is achievable in merely 4.7 seconds (partly thanks to the traction of 4matic, too). Another thing it does better than its rivals is exhaust note. As in other turbocharged AMG engines, it deliberately retards ignition on downshifts to produce exciting pops and crackles on engine overrun. This happens only at Sport+ mode so that not to affect refinement in regular driving.



Apart from power, the C450 is also beefed up in the chassis. Its suspension is retuned with more negative camber to enhance roadholding. Stiffer springs, bushings and steering knuckles tighten its body control and sharpen its response. Like C63, the air suspension is replaced with 3-stage adaptive dampers to remove the extra layer of isolation between driver and the road. The brakes get larger, while the variable-ratio power steering comes from C63. Most important, 4matic system is fitted as standard on this car. Unlike those fitted to regular Mercedes models, it is default to send two-thirds of power to the rear wheels under normal driving conditions. Mind you, not even the C63 is benefited with 4-wheel-drive hardware.

On the road, the C450 AMG is really fun to drive. Its steering is quicker and more feelsome than BMW’s. The brakes are strong and reassuring. With the suspension set at sportier modes, the body is tightly controlled. The traction afforded by the 4matic is always excellent, especially on slippery surfaces. Undoubtedly, it is less likely to slide on throttle than the C63, but its lighter nose actually makes it feel more agile in the twisty. Does it understeer? Yes, but since most of the power goes to the rear axle, the understeer happens only at hard cornering and, even then, is too subtle to complain. As a result, it feels a lot more agile than Audi S4.

Benefitted with stronger performance, sportier noise, better steering and handling, the C450 AMG has become the car to beat in its class. In fact, it is so good that many will find the pricier C63 superfluous. We will have that car reviewed soon to find out.
Verdict:
 Published on 5 Mar 2015
All rights reserved. 
AMG C63


I don’t understand why Mercedes-Benz is usually called Mercedes. Here in Hong Kong (as well as in China and Taiwan), we always call the brand Benz, just to reflect how much we respect the inventor of motor cars instead of adoring the daughter of a Daimler sales manager (read the history of Daimler here). However, from now on we can no longer call the fabulous cars built by AMG as Benz. Starting from the new C63, they will be rebranded as Mercedes-AMG. Meanwhile, the most luxurious cars will be called Mercedes-Maybach while mass production models remain to be Mercedes-Benz. This new branding strategy also allows the company to better distinguish the pure AMG models from the new lines of AMG-tweaked models such as Mercedes-Benz C450 AMG.

No matter what brand it carries, the new C63 is a great car. You already know how good the W205-series C-class is – tasteful design, classy interior, high-aluminum-content chassis, sophisticated suspensions and superb refinement, to name a few. It forms a solid basis for AMG to build upon. The best part of the C63 is the engine, of course. We do miss the old 6.2-liter V8, but the new M177 4.0-liter twin-turbo V8 is equally a masterpiece. It is basically a wet-sump version of the one serving AMG GT sports car, but it is tuned to produce slightly more power. The standard car offers 476 horsepower and 479 pound-foot of torque, which is already sufficient to overwhelm its arch-rival BMW M3 (431 hp / 406 lbft from a 3-liter straight-six turbo) and Audi RS4 Avant (450 hp / 317 lbft from an atmospheric 4.2 V8). But this time around AMG wants more, so it offers a superior model called C63 S, which has the turbo boost pressure increased from 1.1 to 1.2 bar, lifting the output to an unprecedented 510 hp and 516 lbft. The combination of V8 and turbocharging must be the worst nightmare to its rivals. AMG is simply too generous to its customers!

The AMG V8 might lack the complicated cross-bank piping and twin-scroll turbos of BMW and Audi’s V8 (even though it employs the same “hot-V” architecture), but its throttle response is hardly slower and turbo lag is hardly noticeable, at least at this relatively low state of tune. Yes, even the 510 hp version is not really under stress. Considering it is practically made by joining two A45 AMG engines at a common crankshaft, and that engine produces some 360 horsepower, the V8 should be theoretically good for 700 hp if it runs the same state of tune! Audi’s 4.0-liter twin-turbo V8 produces 580 hp in Bentley Continental GT3-R, so you can see how much room is left for AMG to progress in the future – think about a C63 Black series with close to 600 hp…



The M177 is no lighter than the 6.2-liter M156 due to its extra turbos, intercoolers and liquid, but it is more compact and fits easily under the bonnet of C63 (it would not fit if its turbos were mounted outboard). Bolted behind the engine is a 7-speed MCT gearbox, which is another thing that distinguishes the bespoke AMG model from “Benz”. Its multi-plate clutch enables faster gearchanges than the torque converter on the usual 7G-Tronic. If you ask me which gearbox I prefer, I would say the twin-clutch units of AMG GT or BMW M3, because their gearshifts are more responsive and incisive when you demand. However, the MCT is smoother at more relaxing pace, and what it lacks in outright speed is easily compensated by the tremendous torque from the V8. As a result, the C63 S is capable to storm from zero to 60 mph in 3.9 seconds. Bye bye M3!

In the real world, the new V8 is absolutely the highlight of the car. Its power is punchy and highly flexible. It spins smoothly and is eager to visit the 7000 rpm redline – just 200 rpm shy of the 6.2 – although you don’t really need to do so. Better still, it sounds like a supercar engine. It starts with a theatrical surge of rev before settling into a distant warble. Prod the throttle and you’ll be excited by an angry bark. Rev it higher, the bassy exhaust note intensifies and transforms into a thundering howl once the secondary valves in exhaust open. The aural journey ends up with dramatic backfires and crackles on the overrun. This is unfortunate to BMW, because once you have listened to the AMG V8, you won’t stand the dull exhaust noise of the M3 or its digitally synthesized one.

Unexpectedly, it also beats the M3 in emission. The standard C63 emits only 192 grams of  carbon-dioxide each kilometer (195 grams for C63 S), slightly less than the six-cylinder M3 (194 with DCT or 204 with manual). This represents a 31 percent reduction from the old 6.2 engine.



The rest of the car is not as special as the engine but nonetheless very effective. Its suspensions are heavily retuned with 25 mm lower ride height, stiffer springs and anti-roll bars, more negative cambers and wider tracks. Standard adaptive dampers offer 3 stages of setting. The brakes are upgraded to 360 mm front and 330 mm rear (ceramic is optional). The AMG electrical power steering has faster ratio than those of the regular C-class, but it has the variable-ratio element ditched to favour of a more consistent response. The standard car is fitted with a mechanical LSD while S model gets an active differential for better control of under/oversteer. The S also gets larger wheels and a Porsche-style adaptive engine/transmission mount.

On the road, these changes result in excellent handling and control. Due to the heavier nose, the AMG is not quite as agile or well balanced as the M3. It is also more prone to oversteer because you have far more torque to play with. However, the oversteer is well managed by the stability control. Moreover, its rear breaks away in a predictable manner, so the oversteer is playful rather than scary. The modified front suspension offers bags of grip and keeps the nose pointing to the right direction. The stiffer suspension and adaptive dampers keep body roll to the minimum. The steering might be less communicative than the old hydraulic rack, but it is more precise and direct. Compared with the M3’s rack it is lighter and feels more natural. The ride is definitely firm in any modes, but still the car absorbs bumps cleanly and beats BMW for comfort. The only complaint is excessive tire noise.

In addition to the superb interior, the smooth transmission and superior engine refinement, the C63 is easily the choice for everyday driving. What’s more impressive is whenever you want to have fun, plant the throttle and you will wake up one of the greatest engines in the world. Benz or not, the C63 is a marvelous creation.
Verdict:

 Published on 4 Dec 2015
All rights reserved. 
C-class Coupe and AMG C63 Coupe


The last generation C-class Coupe was a bit embarrassing. While Audi and BMW started selling A5 and 4-Series as separate lines, Mercedes worked against the trend and turned what previously called CLK to part of the C-class family. That didn’t benefit the image of a niche car. Moreover, the first C-class Coupe was not sufficiently differentiated from the sedan. If not the hot AMG C63 and Black series, we would have forgotten it long ago. Now in its second incarnation, will it do better?

Exterior design is the most important element to this kind of sedan-based coupes, as people buy them primarily for looks. The new C-class Coupe does look sufficiently different from the sedan, but not necessarily in a good way. Sure, it gets smoother thanks to the Zeppelin-airship shape, but it doesn’t feel any faster, just like the Zeppelin. The problem is a proportion too fat, blame to the high waistline. If Mercedes could lower the base line of its side windows by a couple of inches, it would have looked lighter and slimmer. Unfortunately, the hard points of C-class sedan is a limiting factor. Ditto the need to maintain a high boot lid to keep luggage space and aerodynamic lift in check. Cadillac ATS Coupe has a similar problem, but BMW 4-Series is more successful to hide its bulk.



The ill proportion of Mercedes is also reflected in the lack of balance front to rear – its bonnet is simply too long, whereas the tail is made unobvious by the waterdrop shape. As a result, it looks nose-heavy. That is almost an insult to its rear-drive chassis. In fact, I found the C-class sedan more balanced and therefore more handsome.

If styling is not a good reason to buy the C-class Coupe, will the mechanical package be? Unlikely either. The coupe has its suspensions set 15 mm lower and a little stiffer, but these bring no fundamental differences to the driving character. Likewise, the steering is tuned to be a little bit heavier and quicker, but you won’t confuse it with a sports car. Curiously, by ditching 2 rear doors the car actually gains about 50 kg. This means most versions will be slower than the equivalent sedans. They will be slower than the comparable 4-Series, too, as Mercedes' engines and automatic transmission are not as responsive as BMW's.

Like its sedan sibling, the high point of C-class Coupe should be its cabin, which is stylish, technically advanced and richly appointed. The rear seats fail to accommodate 6-footers but they are still quite generous for a coupe. The car works best as a comfort-biased coupe, especially with the class-exclusive air suspensions fitted.

AMG C63



Again, the only C-class Coupe that thrills keen drivers is the AMG C63, especially the hotter C63 S. Power comes from the same 4-liter twin-turbo V8 as the C63 sedan, producing 476 hp and 479 lbft in the base model or 510 hp and 516 lbft in S model. They also work with faster-changing MCT gearbox instead of the torque converter automatic of lesser models. Needless to say, performance is startling. The C63 S is capable of 0-60 mph in a 911-beating 3.8 seconds, thanks in part to a shorter final drive ratio. Its top speed is normally limited to 155 mph, but in case a special driver package is opted, it can be lifted to 180 mph.

However, what makes the C63 Coupe different is the suspension. Compared with the C63 sedan, its rear suspension is heavily modified. The track is 46 mm wider than the 4-door’s. The geometry is revised to increase negative camber. Moreover, all control arms except the toe control links are now rigidly mounted to the subframe through ball-joints rather than rubber bushings to eliminate slack. Up front, the front suspension is adapted to boost 38 mm wider track while the steering gets stiffer knuckles to enhance precision. Furthermore, front and rear tires get 10 mm and 20 mm wider respectively over the sedan’s.



On the road, the ride is definitely firm, even firmer than the sedan. The wide rubbers generate more noise than you would expect for a car wearing 3-pointed star badge. However, the precision it brings is also clearly higher than the 4-door. The steering is heavier and more direct. The chassis is still subjected to power slide easily – think of those mountains of mid-range torque afforded by the twin-turbo V8 – but its balance is now more neutral. Transition from under to oversteer is more progressive, more controllable. You can have big fun driving the C63 S Coupe, drifting it endlessly on track until its tires get worn, or enjoy the aural feast of the AMG V8, whose exhaust note is second to none in the turbocharged world! Yes, it is not as agile as the lighter M4 or Cadillac ATS-V, but given the far superior power and sound, who cares?

The weakest link is the MCT gearbox. As we always know, its response is not as quick as the DCT of BMW, and its electronic brain is not as clever. That is also why AMG’s own sports car (GT) chose DCT instead.

Overall, the C63 Coupe is no less desirable than its sedan sibling. It is more expensive, but you will feel the premium over its 6-cylinder rivals well spent. The only question is: is it sufficiently better than the C63 sedan in handling to offset the reduced accommodation, ride refinement and arguably the less pretty look? That is more difficult to answer.
Verdict:
 Published on 7 Jun 2016
All rights reserved. 
C-class Cabriolet


Normally, we prefer coupes to their equivalent cabriolets. However, in the case of Mercedes C-class, the reverse is to be said. One of the strongest reasons is the improved style. While the Coupe looks quite fat and unbalanced, the Cabriolet has a healthier proportion thanks to the removal of the curvy roof line. The larger piece of chrome surrounding its tonneau cover, which extends through the door tops all the way to the windscreen pillars, brings an extra sense of elegance. Moreover, the fabric roof is very well engineered. It raises and drops in 20 seconds, and can do so at up to 50 km/h. When the roof is down, wind buffeting is all but eliminated by the unique Mercedes Aircap, which pops up an aero foil from the windscreen header to redirect air flow away from your head. Although it was launched 6 years ago in E-class Cabriolet, Aircap is still yet to be matched by others. When the roof is up, the cabin is remarkably calm. Moreover, it enables the boot to swallow 355 liters of luggage. The rear seat offers enough space for sub-6-footers as long as the front occupants are willing to cooperate. This is a stylish and high-quality 4-seat cabriolet.



In the dynamic side, you have to admire how few compromises the open-top conversion brings. It adds just 125 kg to the kerb weight. For comparison, a BMW 4-Series Cabriolet carries an extra 225 kg while Audi A3 Cabriolet adds 180 kg over their hardtop versions. Despite that, the chassis of C-class Cabriolet is impressively rigid. You won’t sense any differences except on the worst surfaces where it would shimmy a little. With the suspension set at Comfort mode, the ride is supple. At sportier modes, it maintains the fine handling of the C-class coupe and sedan.

Most impressive is the AMG-built C63 S Cabriolet. With 510 horsepower for disposal and a 0-60 mph time of 4 seconds flat, it is supercar fast. Moreover, with the roof dropped you can hear more of its V8 howl. Like its sedan and coupe siblings, the driving experience is extremely thrilling – the tight body control, the strong front-end grip, the powerful braking, the faithful steering, the fluid power slide and, yes, the amazing engine sound, all contribute to the best 4-seat cabriolet we have ever seen.

Verdict:
C-class Cabriolet: 
C63 Cabriolet: 
Specifications





Year
Layout
Chassis
Body
Length / width / height
Wheelbase
Engine
Capacity
Valve gears
Induction
Other engine features
Max power
Max torque
Transmission
Suspension layout

Suspension features
Tires

Kerb weight
Top speed
0-60 mph (sec)
0-100 mph (sec)
C250
2014
Front-engined, RWD
Steel + aluminum monocoque
Mainly aluminum
4686 / 1810 / 1442 mm
2840 mm
Inline-4
1991 cc
DOHC 16 valves, DVVT
Turbo
DI
211 hp
258 lbft
7-speed automatic
F: 4-link
R: multi-link
Adaptive air spring + damping
225/50R17

1405 kg
155 mph (limited)
6.3 (c)
-
C250 Bluetec
2014
Front-engined, RWD
Steel + aluminum monocoque
Mainly aluminum
4686 / 1810 / 1442 mm
2840 mm
Inline-4 diesel
2143 cc
DOHC 16 valves
Sequential twin-turbo
CDI
204 hp
369 lbft
7-speed automatic
F: 4-link
R: multi-link
Adaptive air spring + damping
225/50R17

1520 kg
153 mph (c)
6.3 (c)
-
C300 4matic
2014
Front-engined, 4WD
Steel + aluminum monocoque
Mainly aluminum
4686 / 1810 / 1442 mm
2840 mm
Inline-4
1991 cc
DOHC 16 valves, DVVT
Turbo
DI
245 hp
273 lbft
7-speed automatic
F: 4-link
R: multi-link
Adaptive air spring + damping
F: 225/45R18
R: 245/40R18
1630 kg
155 mph (limited)
6.1*
16.0*




Performance tested by: *C&D





Year
Layout
Chassis
Body
Length / width / height
Wheelbase
Engine
Capacity
Valve gears
Induction
Other engine features
Max power
Max torque
Transmission
Suspension layout

Suspension features
Tires

Kerb weight
Top speed
0-60 mph (sec)

0-100 mph (sec)
C400 4matic
2014
Front-engined, 4WD
Steel + aluminum monocoque
Mainly aluminum
4686 / 1810 / 1442 mm
2840 mm
V6, 60-degree
2996 cc
DOHC 24 valves, DVVT
Twin-turbo
DI
333 hp / 5250-6000 rpm
354 lbft / 1600-4000 rpm
7-speed automatic
F: 4-link
R: multi-link
Adaptive air spring + damping
F: 225/45R18
R: 245/40R18
1570 kg
155 mph (limited)
5.0 (c) / 4.7*

11.6*
C450 AMG 4matic /
AMG C43 4matic

2015
Front-engined, 4WD
Steel + aluminum monocoque
Mainly aluminum
4755 / 1810 / 1425 mm
2840 mm
V6, 60-degree
2996 cc
DOHC 24 valves, DVVT
Twin-turbo
DI
367 hp / 5500-6000 rpm
382 lbft / 2000-4200 rpm
7-speed automatic
F: 4-link
R: multi-link
Adaptive damping
F: 225/45R18
R: 245/40R18
1615 kg
155 mph (limited)
4.7 (c) / 4.5*

11.2*
AMG C63 S
2015
Front-engined, RWD
Steel + aluminum monocoque
Mainly aluminum
4756 / 1839 / 1426 mm
2840 mm
V8, 90-degree
3982 cc
DOHC 32 valves, DVVT
Twin-turbo
DI
510 hp / 5500-6250 rpm
516 lbft / 1750-4500 rpm
7-speed MCT
F: 4-link
R: multi-link
Adaptive damping
F: 245/35ZR19
R: 265/35ZR19
1655 kg
180 mph (limited)
3.9 (c) / 3.9* / 3.7* / 4.1** /
4.0***
9.1* / 8.1* / 8.9** / 8.8***




Performance tested by: *C&D, **Autocar, ***MT





Year
Layout
Chassis
Body
Length / width / height
Wheelbase
Engine
Capacity
Valve gears
Induction
Other engine features
Max power
Max torque
Transmission
Suspension layout

Suspension features
Tires

Kerb weight
Top speed
0-60 mph (sec)
0-100 mph (sec)
C300 Coupe
2015
Front-engined, RWD
Steel + aluminum monocoque
Mainly aluminum
4686 / 1810 / 1405 mm
2840 mm
Inline-4
1991 cc
DOHC 16 valves, DVVT
Turbo
DI
245 hp
273 lbft
7-speed automatic
F: 4-link
R: multi-link
Adaptive air spring + damping
225/50R17

1490 kg
155 mph (limited)
5.7 (c) / 6.2*
16.2*
AMG C43 4matic Coupe
2016
Front-engined, 4WD
Steel + aluminum monocoque
Mainly aluminum
4696 / 1810 / 1405 mm
2840 mm
V6, 60-degree
2996 cc
DOHC 24 valves, DVVT
Twin-turbo
DI
367 hp / 5500-6000 rpm
382 lbft / 2000-4200 rpm
9-speed automatic
F: 4-link
R: multi-link
Adaptive damping
F: 225/45R18
R: 245/40R18
1660 kg
155 mph (limited)
4.5 (c)
-
AMG C63 S Coupe
2015
Front-engined, RWD
Steel + aluminum monocoque
Mainly aluminum
4750 / 1877 / 1400 mm
2840 mm
V8, 90-degree
3982 cc
DOHC 32 valves, DVVT
Twin-turbo
DI
510 hp / 5500-6250 rpm
516 lbft / 1750-4500 rpm
7-speed MCT
F: 4-link
R: multi-link
Adaptive damping
F: 255/35ZR19
R: 285/30ZR19
1725 kg
180 mph (limited)
3.8 (c) / 3.8* / 3.8**
8.3* / 8.5**




Performance tested by: *C&D, **R&T





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C-class


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AMG C63


C-class / C43 Coupe


AMG C63 Coupe



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