Ferrari F12


Debut: 2012
Maker: Ferrari
Predecessor: 599GTB



 Published on 20 Oct 2012 All rights reserved. 

Ferrari's flagship V12 tries to steal the limelight from its mid-engined sisters again.


Since the days of F355, Ferrari's 12-cylinder flagship line has been struggling to convince customers that it provides better performance and handling than the mid-engined V8 line. The F512M failed to do so. Ditto 550 Maranello and 575M. Saviour came in the form of 599GTB some six years ago. Not only providing GT comfort and user friendliness, it demonstrated better balance and body control than the contemporary F430, not to mention the superior power and smoothness brought by its V12 engine. As a result, we declared it the best driving Ferrari of the time.

However, the balance tipped to the mid-engined camp again with the launch of 458 Italia. This is truly a landmark creation, lifting speed, handling and driving thrills to unprecedented levels. Its sexy body also makes the 599 a bit dull and old-fashioned. The special edition 599GTO struck back in 2010, but the flagship line no longer enjoyed a superior image. It is time for a full upgrade.

So here comes the new F12 Berlinetta. Its name does not come from any existing nomenclatures of Maranello – the F stands for Ferrari, while 12 is the number of different grades of aluminum its chassis employed. No matter for engineering, performance or driving thrills, the progress it has taken from 599 is comparable to the evolution from F430 to 458, which means huge. Therefore it has a good chance to take back the crown again.


The progress it has taken from 599 is comparable to the evolution from F430 to 458, which means huge.


Chassis and Body

Compare with its predecessor, the F12 is made more compact. We won't call it small, but the fact that it is 47 mm shorter, 18 mm narrower and runs a 30 mm shorter wheelbase is encouraging news following so many years of growth. The smaller size, in addition to the use of different grades of aluminum parts for the construction of its spaceframe chassis allows Ferrari to cut 60 kilograms from the final kerb weight while lifting torsional rigidity by 20 percent. At 1525 kg dry, the F12 is 50 kilos lighter than the Lamborghini Aventador with carbon-fiber chassis, although the Lambo does sports four-wheel drive hardware. Ferrari proves that aluminum chassis is still viable on "production" supercars.

Even more important is how the weight is distributed. If you admire the 599's front-to-rear balance of 47:53, you must adore the new car's 46:54, which is incredible for a front-engined machine. The one percent of extra weight acted on its rear wheels should improve traction further, while less weight over the front axle should improve turn-in response. Equally important is the center of gravity. Thanks to lowering the roof by a massive 62 mm (the F12 is even lower than the low-looking 550M), mount the V12 engine 30 mm closer to the ground as well as lowering the dashboard and seats altogether, its center of gravity is 25 mm lower than that of its predecessor. This benefits cornering stability.


If you admire the 599's front-to-rear balance of 47:53, you must adore the new car's 46:54, which is incredible for a front-engined machine.


The F12 excels in aerodynamics, too. Its drag coefficient is significantly improved from 0.336 to 0.299, which is excellent for a supercar. A couple of aerodynamic aids contribute to that improvement: 1) Aero Bridge channels air from above the bonnet towards the sides, interacting with the turbulence from the front wheels to reduce drag; 2) Active Brake Cooling closes the front brake cooling intakes normally to reduce drag and opens only when the brakes get too hot. Downforce is also its strength. Brilliantly, without resorting to a standalone or pop-up rear spoiler, the F12's improved shape and large under-floor diffusers manage to generate 123 kg of downforce at 124 mph (200km/h).

Regarding styling, I am leaving it to you to make your own judgment. However, most people agree that it looks sharper and sexier than the 599, if not the most beautiful shape Ferrari and Pininfarina had created.

Engine, transmission and performance

The 6262 cc direct-injected V12 is a derivative of the one serving Ferrari FF. It runs a super-high compression ratio of 13.5:1, compare to the FF's 12.3:1, along with freer intake manifolds and exhaust and faster cam timing. Titanium connecting rods are reserved for the possible GTO version in the future, but this production engine is still capable of revving to 8700 rpm, 300 rpm higher than 599GTB and 200 higher than Lamborghini Aventador. This eagerness for rev is partly contributed by its oversquare combustion chambers with 94 mm bore and 75.2 mm stroke.


The motor pumps out 740hp, a new height for Ferrari road cars – actually matching today's Formula 1 V8 engines!


At 8250 rpm, the motor pumps out an astonishing 740 horsepower, a new height for Ferrari road cars – actually matching today's Formula 1 V8 engines! That figure translates to an impressive specific output of 118 horsepower per liter. The new V12 is not only 120 hp more powerful than its predecessor (or 70 hp more than GTO) but also surpasses Lamborghini Aventador by 40 hp, despite of less capacity. Its maximum torque is 509 pound-foot. 80 percent of which is available from 2500 rpm, so excellent tractability is guaranteed.

As previewed by the FF, the rear-mounted transaxle has switched from the outgoing 6-speed F1 automated manual gearbox to a 7-speed twin-clutch gearbox jointly developed with Getrag.

Ferrari claims the car tops more than 340 km/h or 211 mph, while 0-60 mph sprint takes 3 seconds flat. The latter might not match the 4-wheel-drive Aventador, but more important is it takes only 8.5 seconds to do 0-124 mph, nearly a second quicker than the big Lambo. Judging by acceleration, it is the fastest Ferrari road car ever. Judging by lap time on Ferrari's own Fiorano test track, it is also the fastest. With a time of 1 minute and 23 seconds, it beats 599GTB by 3.5 seconds, Enzo and 458 Italia by 2 seconds, and 599GTO by one second. And this is just the beginning of its development...

Meanwhile, the car also gets greener. Thanks to the new gearbox and automatic engine stop-start system (which has a silly name: HELE, or High Emotion, Low Emission), the F12 Berlinetta has its fuel economy improved from 15.8 to 18.8 mpg. Carbon-dioxide emission is reduced by 16 percent to 350 g/km.


It takes only 8.5 seconds to do 0-124 mph, nearly a second quicker than the big Lambo.


Suspensions and electronics

Like FF, the F12 rides on double-wishbones suspensions up front and a new 5-link axle at the rear. The latest generation of magnetorheological adaptive damping gains secondary coils for quicker response while generate less friction. New gen carbon-ceramic brakes (CCM3) are also said to be improved. Apart from the carried-over F1-Trac traction control, the new E-Diff electronic-controlled active differential should be able to regulate the torque split between left and right rear wheels more precisely and responsively than those brake-actuated torque vectoring systems. This must be a big advantage over the 599.

On the Road

Climb aboard, the environment should be familiar to the owners of recent Ferraris. The mix and match of carbon-fiber trims, leather, plastic, alloy and circular air vents may be not as tasteful as Aston Martin Vanquish or Pagani Huayra, but this place is unquestionably spacious, comfortable and functional. Despite of the downsize, the F12 offers the same excellent accommodation for 2 tall drivers and an even larger, 500-liter boot under the hatchback door. The driving position and seats are superb. Visibility is excellent for a supercar. You rarely need to distraction attention from the instrument because sat nav and infotainment system are displayed at the TFT screens sandwiching the center rev counter, all located within the instrument binnacle. Most frequently used buttons are found on the Playstation-style steering wheel, including the famous Manettino rotary switch which gives access to 5 driving modes – Wet, Sport, Race, Traction Control Off and Stability Control Off. Similarly, gearshift paddles mounted at the steering column ease your hard work and keep your concentration to the road, even though I still miss the aluminum ball gear knob of older Ferraris. It goes without saying that Ferrari pioneered this design 15 years ago on F355. I doubt any other supercars could serve the need of hardcore drivers as good as Ferrari.


You are not served with the ugly wastegate whoosh of its turbocharged rivals, but a neverending high-pitch mechanical noise that only an Italian V12 or Formula One engine can produce!


Press the Start button on the steering wheel, the mighty V12 bursts into live. Just as you would expect for a Ferrari V12, it is incredibly smooth, free-revving and soulful. There seems to be little inertia to overcome. It responds instantly to your throttle input, rewards your prod with angry barks. Engage the first gear, guide it to the motorway and start exploring its deep reserves, you will be shocked with its new found performance – the acceleration is so strong and seamless (thanks to the dual-clutch gearbox) that it can easily eclipse McLaren F1. Well, the g-force is not as exaggerate as Bugatti Veyron or a Pagani Huayra under full boost, but the driving experience is no less breathtaking. Better still, you are not served with the ugly wastegate whoosh of its turbocharged rivals, but a neverending high-pitch mechanical noise that only an Italian V12 or Formula One engines can produce! At lower rev the cabin is dominated by creamy induction noise. As rev rise it gradually gives way to the exhaust noise, which gets increasingly intense and eventually goes mad beyond 8000 rpm. This is a noise every supercar should possess!

Storm the car through some mountain roads and you will realize its dual-personality. On the one hand, it is a decent grand tourer. Apart from the cabin space and luggage capacity it offers, it is comfortable for covering long distances. The ride in the softest suspension setting is absorbent enough. The gearbox in auto mode shifts smoothly. The engine noise is well checked at normal cruising speed. The clever traction and stability control masks the beast side of the car remarkably well, always keeping it running on the desired path. The electronic intervention is so subtle that sometimes you might forget that you are driving a supercar with 740 hp running through its rear tires.


On the one hand, it is a decent grand tourer. On the other hand, it possesses sports car sharpness and communication.


On the other hand, the F12 possesses sports car sharpness and communication. Its hydraulic-assisted steering is not only feelsome but also very direct – actually, it uses the same 2.0 turns lock-to-lock gearing ratio as the 458. Traditionalists might regard that to be too quick to the extent of nervous, but recalibrate your mind and you will find the new rack makes the F12 feels incredibly small and responsive compare with its predecessors. Tight cornering needs no more than a small flick of the steering wheel, and a tiny counter steer can kick its tail out, so handy! The shorter wheelbase and active differential also enhance its sense of agility a lot. The immense grip and traction give you maximum confidence to attack corners at speeds well beyond the capability of 599, GTO included. The ceramic brakes are not only monstrously powerful but also give excellent feel. The F12 feels more like a lighter mid-engined sports car!

Ultimately, it is not as sporty as the marvelous 458, which feels a touch sharper to steer and rolls less in corner. With ESP and F1-Trac completely switched off, the F12 could reveal its temper should you abuse its ultra-quick steering in a bend. It will respond with big oversteer. After all, this car has more punch than Aventador yet it relies on rear tires only to put down the power.

I would still pick 458 as my favourite sports car of all, but if you need a supercar that combines sports car excitement and GT comfort, the F12 Berlinetta is the best of the bunch. It might lack Lamborghini's sense of occasion, but it is actually faster on the road, more soulful to drive and far more practical to use everyday.
Verdict: 
 Published on 28 Nov 2015 All rights reserved. 
F12tdf

The F12tdf is clearly oriented to race tracks, more so than 458 Speicale or its precedessor 599GTO...


It is hard to imagine how Ferrari F12 Berlinetta could be improved further on performance and handling. This car is right at the limit of a front-engined rear-drive GT as its V12 produces an astonishing 740 horsepower, its twin-clutch gearbox shifts lightning quick and its ultra-direct (2.0 turns lock to lock) steering is fast to the extent of nearly nervous. Can it handle even more power and sharper chassis tuning? I doubt, but will be glad to see.

So this is it. F12tdf, whose suffix stands for Tour de France. If you are familiar with the history of Ferrari you must remember the legendary 250GT Tour de France, a car that made Ferrari famous in the 1950s. The 3300-miles Tour de France race comprised of many hill climb and rally stages, something I'm afraid the new car would fail to do. The F12tdf is clearly oriented to race tracks, more so than 458 Speicale or its precedessor 599GTO. Its aggressive front splitter, winglets and side skirts leave so little ground clearance. These aero kits give it 230 kg of downforce at 200 km/h (124 mph), more than double of the standard car. Also contribute to this remarkable figure are the louvers opened at the rear wheel arches, which releases air pressure built up within the wheel wells and by the way provide a visual link to the classic 250 GTO. The larger and higher set rear spoiler also generate more downforce. Thanks to a slower angle rear screen and two recess channels either side of it, more air is channeled towards the rear spoiler thus makes the latter even more effective.


These aero kits give it 230 kg of downforce at 200 km/h.


The 6.3-liter direct-injection V12, which already achieves a sky-high specific output of 118 hp per liter in Berlinetta, is massaged further in the Tdf. By using less restrictive airboxes, larger throttle bodies and mechanical tappets instead of hydraulic ones, which cuts inertia and increases valve lift a little, the new engine has its redline lifted by 200 rpm to 8900 rpm. At 8500 rpm, it produces 780 horsepower, 40 more than before. By the way, it surpasses Aston Martin One-77 to be the most powerful FR car in the world, despite the fact that its engine is a full liter smaller. Don’t think these aggressive tuning would hamper its low-end tractability. Ferrari has introduced a new variable trumpet system to alter the effective length of intake manifolds according to rev. As a result, the V12 still offers 80 percent of its max. torque from as low as 2500 rpm. Meanwhile, the peak torque is improved slightly to 520 lbft at 6750 rpm.

To aid acceleration further, the 7-speed twin-clutch transaxle is given 6% shorter ratios and remapped for faster gearshifts, i.e. 30% quicker on upshifts and 40% quicker on downshifts. Consequently, the official 0-60 mph time is reduced by a couple of tenths to 2.8 seconds. 0-124 mph is cut by 0.6 seconds to 7.9 seconds (that's 0.4 sec faster than 488 GTB). Top speed is unchanged at 211 mph-plus.

The special edition also trims 110 kg of fat, thanks in part to the smaller rear window and rear quarter windows as well as more use of carbon-fiber inside and outside, such as the doors. As expected, the interior gets more spartan. Leather trims are replaced with Alcantara while carpets and glovebox are deleted. The door panels become bare carbon-fiber, ditto the instrument pod. However, air-con and sat-nav are intact, as rich buyers could no longer live without them.


Ferrari deliberately uses wider front tires to induce oversteer. At the same time, it introduces a rear-wheel steering to tame the otherwise nervous handling.


However, the most influential change is not weight saving but the philosophy of its chassis tuning. The tdf has its Pirelli P-Zero Corsa front rubbers widened by 20 mm to 275/35ZR20. This is unusually wide compared with the 315/35ZR20 rear tires. If you have studied the Handling section of our Technical School, you may know the wider the tire the less slip angle it produces. Furthermore, if the slip angle of front tires is smaller than rear tires, the car is prone to oversteer. In order to sharpen its handling, making it more agile and more responsive to steering input, Ferrari deliberately uses wider front tires to induce oversteer. At the same time, it introduces a rear-wheel-steering system to tame the otherwise nervous handling. This recalls my memory of X-29 experimental fighter jet (I was enthusiastic with aircrafts, tanks, warships etc. in my childhood), whose forward-swept wings were designed to be inherently unstable and therefore agile, and it used computer to adjust the flaps repeatedly to keep it stable in the air. The F12tdf is the same. Its rear wheels may steer up to 2 degrees in the same direction as the front to counter the oversteer. The adjustment works busily through corners, and Ferrari’s control system is good enough to hide its intervention. As a result, you only feel the car incredibly sharp and agile. The electromechanical RWS hardware is supplied by ZF (same supplier as Porsche). It adds only 5 kg to the car.

The suspension of tdf gets 20 percent stiffer springs than the Berlinetta, which should make it marginal for road use. Fortunately, it retains the magnetorheological adaptive dampers. The braking system gets more powerful, as the one-piece calipers come from LaFerrari. Overall, the combination of more power, faster gearshift, lighter and sharper chassis, more downforce and better brakes allows the F12tdf to lap Fiorano track in 1:21, two seconds clear of the standard F12 and 488GTB. BTW, LaFerrari remains at the top with a lap time of 1:19.7.

On the Road


The tdf is more precise, more responsive but less tolerable to errors...


When you drive the tdf on typical Italian country roads outside Maranello, the differences from the standard car is immediately noticeable. Its suspension feels quite a lot firmer. In Comfort mode the ride quality is barely bearable. Other modes are best reserved for the smoothest roads or race tracks. It seems to lack the dual-purpose versatility of 458 Speciale, whereas the standard F12 is definitely a better road car.

Likewise, the gearshift speed is so aggressive that you can feel its hunger for race track victories. However, the V12 is marvelous. Its response is ultra-fast, its noise is glorious, its endless rev and elastic delivery are all peerless. Can you feel the extra 40 hp? Probably not on the road as the standard car is already too powerful to exploit, but you do feel the added sharpness of throttle response. In fact, it is so sharp that some might feel nervous in the first encounter.

The handling is a similar story. The tdf's steering is light, fast yet swiss-watch precise. It doesn't understeer at all, just responds to your steering input without hesitation. The standard F12 shares the same ultra-quick steering, but its chassis allows a bit stablizing understeer to absorb your over-reaction. In contrast, the tdf is more precise, more responsive but less tolerable to errors. You have to be delicate on throttle and steering to achieve the best results. If you master that technique, you will find a machine very hard to be beaten on tracks. Yes, it is more difficult to drive than most of the current generation supercars, but it is also a car that rewards better drivers. The more you drive it, the more you learn from it, and the more satisfaction you get. It is not just a machine but a mate with strong personality.

That’s why the car can stand proudly against the likes of Aventador SV and even some more expensive supercars. At £340,000, it is a full £100K more than the F12 Berlinetta. With a production volume of 799 units, it is not exactly rare (Sergio Marchionne is greedy). Still, the F12tdf is special and worth the investment.
Verdict:
 Published on 23 Jun 2017 All rights reserved. 
812 Superfast


Does it need more power? No, but Ferrari has to keep it ahead of Lamborghini Aventador or the likes of McLaren 720S.


In the supercar business, you cannot stop chasing more power and speed, or you will be overshadowed by rivals and suddenly look like a thing of the past. Even a car with a bloodline as prestigious as Ferrari F12 faces the same pressure. The F12 has been acclaimed for combining GT usability with supercar speed and feel. Nothing in the front-engined world could match its straight line speed, sharp throttle response, lightning steering, great balance and well sorted at-the-limit handling. In fact, it made the following F12tdf look over the top, too wild to be tamed by most drivers. What I cannot imagine is how Ferrari could improve it further. Does it need more power? No, but Ferrari has to do that in order to keep it ahead of Lamborghini Aventador or some other cars entering the 700hp Club recently, such as McLaren 720S. The result is a neat 800 horsepower, which explains the first digit of the new car’s name. The remaining is more obvious – 12 cylinders and Superfast. Yes, superfast, no kidding.

The last time Ferrari used the Superfast name was more than 50 years ago on the 500 Superfast. Back then, Superfast meant 400 horsepower yet that was obviously overstated. It also meant an overstated 174 mph top speed and 0-60 mph time of 6 seconds. Today, the Superfast means a solid 211 mph and 0-60 mph in 2.8 seconds. Both cars might share the same format of FR and a large V12, but their characters couldn’t be more different. The 500 Superfast was heavy, luxurious and comfort-biased. It was hopeless to match a, say, 275GTB in corner. Enzo Ferrari created it just because he wanted the money from wealthy American. In contrast, the 812 is as good a super sports car as a GT, just like the F12. If you want comfort and luxury, you can always choose a Bentley Continental Supersports or Mercedes-AMG S63 or even Ferrari’s own GTC4 Lusso instead. These cars offer more space, a more luxurious interior, lower noise levels and a gentler ride. However, if you want the fastest and the most exciting GT in the world, the 812 is a no brainer.



If you want the fastest and the most exciting GT in the world, the 812 is a no brainer.


Just like the usual mid-life evolutions created by Maranello, the 812 keeps the basic chassis of F12 unchanged but all of its aluminum body panels have been reshaped. Its proportion remains as before, but the body now sports more scoops and outlets to the extent of discomfort. The new openings around the headlights and C-pillars have the design integrity downgraded slightly. You will get used to it, but first impression is that its predecessor looked a little better. That said, I think the new front grille and the quad-taillights are more stylish than the old items, so it is not all about bad news.

Predictably, those scoops are added for the sake of aerodynamics. Air entering the intakes adjacent to the headlights blows out at the outlets midway of the bonnet, generating air curtains that help guiding the surrounding air flow. Likewise, the scoops under the C-pillars draw air towards the outlets located just behind the rear fenders, generating airstreams in the interest for the overall aerodynamics. Meanwhile, the new outlets behind the front wheels guide air up through the sculpted channels at the body sides. At the back, a TDF-style higher ducktail spoiler is adopted to enhance downforce. Under the flat floor there are some adjustable aero devices. Up front, a pair of spring-loaded flaps close automatically under air pressure at 124 mph, blocking the diffusers and reducing drag. At the back, 3 electrical-operated flaps do similar things to the rear diffusers. Overall, Ferrari said its drag is reduced by 3-4 percent without affecting downforce. I would trade such a slim improvement for a more stylish look though.



Drag is reduced by 3-4 percent. I would trade such a slim improvement for a more stylish look though.


Highlight is the new V12, enlarged from 6.3 to 6.5 liters thanks to stretching the stroke from 75.2 to 78mm. Its bore remains at 94mm, the maximum allowed by the block originally designed for the 6-liter Enzo. Its compression ratio inches up from 13.5 to 13.6:1. The intake manifold is new, incorporating the TDF’s variable intake trumpet system. The direct injection system has its pressure increased from 200 to 350 bar, enabling finer atomization of fuel and multiple injections in a cycle. The engine also gets larger valves, higher inlet valve lift and revised cam timing. Despite the longer stroke, now the V12 revs 200 rpm higher to 8900 rpm! Its peak output is 60 horsepower more than before as well as arch-rival Aventador S, now achieved at 8500 rpm instead of 8250 rpm. Maximum torque is improved by 20 lbft to 529 lbft. That is released at an even higher 7000 rpm, which sounds peaky, but it just proves that the engine gets stronger at the top end rather than weaker down the rev. In fact, at least 80 percent of the maximum torque is available from 3500 rpm.

In a bid to sharpen its acceleration further, Maranello has tightened its first 6 gear ratios by 6 percent. The twin-clutch transaxle also gets updated software for even faster shifts – 30 percent faster on upshift and 40 percent quicker on downshift! It goes without saying it is still one of the best DCTs in the world.

In the real world, the 812’s powertrain and performance are incredible. Thanks to the shorter gearing, the V12 feels even sharper in response. Yes, the throttle response is really razor-sharp – even compared with a rival as great as Lamborghini’s V12. It is even more free-revving. The power delivery is remarkably smooth and linear but its noise gets madder and madder above 6000 rpm. Its enthusiasm for rev is stronger than even a 911 GT3. The higher it revs, the more energetic it appears and the angrier it screams. It sounds even madder than the F12! This is simply the world’s best engine any money can buy, but sadly, it might be the last time before mating with electric motors.



This is simply the world’s best engine any money can buy, but sadly, it might be the last time before mating with electric motors.


Frankly, it is difficult to detect the additional performance on public roads. The F12 was already on the very edge of road-going super GTs. It is hard to imagine any more performance could be extracted from road tires and under real world situation. The 0-60 mph time of 2.8 seconds is limited by traction, of which the 812 doesn’t lack, but it will take 4-wheel drive or a change to mid-engine layout to take another leap. A better indicator to its new found performance is 0-124 mph, which is accomplished in 7.9 seconds. That is almost a second quicker than its predecessor as well as Aventador S, and 4/10ths faster than a 488GTB! The new McLaren 720S is a tenth faster still, but that is also a much lighter car (1419 vs 1630kg). In the real world, the 812 feels just astonishingly fast, so fast that you will never ask for more!

Speed is nothing without control. Fortunately, the 812 controls its speed very well. Changes to its chassis is not dramatic. It gets the TDF’s rear-wheel steering hardware, which is linked to all the electronic driving aids (i.e. active differential, SSC side slip control etc.), but here the tuning is less aggressive than the TDF’s. The car’s handling is therefore less edgy and less prone to oversteer at the limit, which is good. Another important change is the steering, which is Ferrari’s first electrical rack. Although it is not truly feelsome, it doesn’t feel much different from the old car’s hydraulic rack. The steering is still geared unusually quick, with only 2.0 turns from lock to lock. Jumping straight from another car, you need some miles to recalibrate your reaction to its lightning response. Once you get used to it, you will appreciate its directness. It feels a tad heavier than before but is still lighter than the steering on most supercars or GTs. That doesn’t affect your confidence though, as its weighting varies consistently to reflect the state of adhesion up front. Ferrari also uses the electric motor to vary the feedback torque during oversteer, so to help you apply counter lock more quickly. The best thing is, it feels so natural that you don’t sense the electronic intervention at all.



The best thing is, it feels so natural that you don’t sense the electronic intervention at all.


With the help of 4WS and electrical power steering, the car feels a tad more agile and less nervous at the limit than the F12. On a twisty track, the 812 might not be good enough to challenge the mid-engined 488, 720S or Ford GT. Its weight distribution (47:53) means less traction can be extracted from its rear tires, and its Pirelli P Zero rubbers are purely for road use, certainly not as grippy as the Corsa or Cup 2 tires. However, this does not deny the Maranello flagship V12 from performing brilliantly on track. Despite the mad side of 800 horsepower, its linear delivery allows you to meter the slip angle precisely in corner. Its SSC manages power slide and recover so smartly. If you turn off the traction control, you can unlock the potential of the car, and it will go sideways everywhere. But still its inherent balance is great, and you can tame the car with delicate control, which is great fun.

What makes the 812 Superfast better than the mid-engined cars is its dual-purpose personality. While its suspension feels slightly stiffer than those of 488 or 720S (partly because you sit closer to the rear axle), it is still competent enough to handle mountain roads. In a more relaxing drive, the engine note and tire noise are quite subdued. The cabin is easily roomier than those cars and easier to access as well. There is a parcel shelf behind the seats and a relatively large boot, so cross-country journeys are easy. As before, it is a competent GT and a supercar simultaneously. The negatives? £253,000 sounds a lot for a front-engined car made of aluminum, and the styling – both exterior and interior – should have been better resolved. 
Verdict:
Specifications





Year
Layout
Chassis
Body
Length / width / height
Wheelbase
Engine
Capacity
Valve gears
Induction
Other engine features
Max power
Max torque
Transmission
Suspension layout

Suspension features
Tires

Kerb weight
Top speed
0-60 mph (sec)
0-100 mph (sec)
0-124 mph (sec)
0-150 mph (sec)
F12 Berlinetta
2012
Front-engined, RWD
Aluminum spaceframe
Aluminum
4618 / 1942 / 1273 mm
2720 mm
V12, 65-degree
6262 cc
DOHC 48 valves, DVVT
-
DI
740 hp / 8250 rpm
509 lbft / 6000 rpm
7-speed twin-clutch
F: double-wishbones
R: multi-link
Adaptive damping
F: 255/35ZR20
R: 315/35ZR20
1630 kg (dry: 1525 kg)
211 mph+ (c)
3.0 (c) / 3.0* / 3.0**
6.5* / 6.0**
8.8**
13.8*
F12tdf
2015
Front-engined, RWD, 4WS
Aluminum spaceframe
Carbon-fiber, aluminum
4656 / 1961 / 1273 mm
2720 mm
V12, 65-degree
6262 cc
DOHC 48 valves, DVVT
VIM
DI
780 hp / 8500 rpm
520 lbft / 6750 rpm
7-speed twin-clutch
F: double-wishbones
R: multi-link
Adaptive damping
F: 275/35ZR20
R: 315/35ZR20
1520 kg (dry: 1415 kg)
211 mph+ (c)
2.8 (c)
-
7.9 (c)
-
812 Superfast
2017
Front-engined, RWD, 4WS
Aluminum spaceframe
Aluminum
4657 / 1971 / 1276 mm
2720 mm
V12, 65-degree
6496 cc
DOHC 48 valves, DVVT
VIM
DI
800 hp / 8500 rpm
529 lbft / 7000 rpm
7-speed twin-clutch
F: double-wishbones
R: multi-link
Adaptive damping
F: 275/35ZR20
R: 315/35ZR20
1630 kg (dry: 1525 kg)
211 mph+ (c)
2.8 (c)
-
7.9 (c)
-




Performance tested by: *Autocar, **Quattroruote





AutoZine Rating

812 Superfast



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